Capital Region Artists Receive Community Grants

Capital Region Artists Receive Community Grants

Congratulations to New York Folklore-supported artists who received a Statewide Community Regrant (SCR). These grants from the New York State Council on the Arts, are distributed by community arts partners. In the Capital Region, we are happy to work with the Arts Center of Capital Region.

At a ceremony at the Arts Center, seven folk and traditional artists accepted a combined total of $16,000. The grants will fund workshops, demonstrations, and performances for each artist in their communities and the general public.

Artists worked with New York Folklore’s Edgar Betelu to complete grant applications at the end of 2021. New York Folklore had identified these talented traditional artists as part of the 2021 Upstate Regional Project.

Congratulations to:

Pinya Aung, Karen Harpist

Ehsue Klay Aung, Karen Dancer

Latifa Ali Mohammad, Afghan Embroidery

Jordan Taylor Hill, African Drumming and Dance

Seth Tagoe Traore, Ghanian Drumming and Dance

Shaman Raphel, Pakistani  Harmonium and Singing

Aurelius John, Pakistani Percussion and Flute

 

 

New York Folklore Announces its Slate for Board of Directors for the 2022-2024 Term

New York Folklore Announces its Slate for Board of Directors for the 2022-2024 Term

The nominating committee of the New York Folklore Board has announced their slate for the 2022-2024 Board of Directors.   Thank you to these talented individuals who have agreed to offer their expertise to New York Folklore!

As is stated in the New York Folklore Society’s bylaws,

Members of the Board of Directors shall be elected by a The Board of Directors, functioning as a nominating committee, shall prepare a slate of candidates for those offices which are open.  The slate of candidate shall be presented to the membership.  Election shall be by majority vote of those members Voting shall be by mailed paper ballot, or by electronic means such as email, on-line survey, or other electronic medium. New offices shall assume their offices immediately upon completion of the election. The term of office for elected officers shall be two years.

Please take a moment to read the biographies of these members and vote for their election to the board at the following link:   Vote Here

We will present the results of this poll via our website.  These new members will join continuing members:  Maria Kennedy, President; Jim Hall, Treasurer; Mira Johnson, Secretary; and board members Wilfredo Morel, Mackenzie Kwok, Ed Y.J.Millar, Will Walker, Evelyn D’Agostino, and Tom van Buren as past President.  With this election, we also express our appreciation to outgoing board members Naomi Sturm-Wijesinghe and Gamileh Jamil.

Not a member of New York Folklore?  Please consider joining us in our work!

Slate of New York Folklore Board Members – 2022-2024

Sandra A. M Bell  – NYC Region  (Production Manager, Producer, Teaching Artist) is a third generation Carnival Costume Designer.  Ms. Bell is CEO of Journeyagents, Inc an artist booking and special event production company. Co-Founder of JOUVAYFEST Collective preserving and presenting Trinidad & Tobago classic style J’ouvert locally, nationally and internationally. Ms. Bell has co-produced 3 CD Recording with Natural Expression Rhythm Band, Punta Rock Explosion & World Connection B.V and Arufudei Wanichigu with Garifuna International Band. Additionally, she is the Production Manager & Agent for Something Positive Inc, premier Afro-Caribbean Performing Arts Company. She has worked with major cultural venues and festival organizations in the United States and abroad.  As a teaching artist consultant in schools, museums & community centers, Ms. Bell assists students in creating visionary and inspiring art. She is a New York Foundation of the Arts Fellow and has earned numerous grants & awards. Ms. Bell has a BA in Arts Administration from NYU & Certificates in Film & Television production from WNET/TV Film & Video School.  Ms. Bell is also is the Individual of The Year for Best Costume Design 2016, 2017, 2018 & 2019 by the Brooklyn Carnival J’ouvert City International  and Trinidad & Tobago Traditional Mas competitions.

 

Nada Odeh – Central New York (teaching artist, museum professional) is an artist, museum curator, and educator who holds a BFA in Fine Arts from the University of Damascus, Syria and an MFA in Museum Studies from Syracuse University.   She has curated exhibitions throughout the United States and in Belgium, and served as a Middle Eastern folk arts consultant for exhibitions and art programs, including NYSCA funded programs at the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn and at New York Folklore.  Currently, she is working on a NYSCA-funded Individual Artists’ grant to design and execute a mural.

 

 

 

Aaron Paige- Hudson Valley  (ethnomusicologist, public folklorist, performing artist, educator) He is the Director of Folk & Traditional Arts at ArtsWestchester where he works in collaboration with many cultural, ethnic, immigrant, and occupational communities to identify, document, safeguard and present the diverse cultural heritage and artistic practices of the region. He holds an MA in ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University and is completing a PhD at the same university. Prior to taking up his position as Director of Folk Arts, Aaron worked as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Denver. His academic work focuses on issues of race, class, caste, and language in the popular music of Tamil Nadu, India, as well as the Tamil diasporas of Malaysia, Singapore, and Canada. He has been studying and performing South Indian percussion for the last two decades under mrdangam artists David Nelson and Palladam R. Ravi. His research has been supported by a Fulbright Fellowship, the Watson Foundation, the Society for Asian Music, the US Department of Education, and the American Institute for Indian Studies.

Vicie A. RollingSouthern Tier Region. (retired educator, storyteller, writer, arts educator)  As a retired Professor of Health and Wellness, Vicie has gone on to more artistic pursuits. She is a “StoryCatcher.” Her avocation is storytelling that includes poetry, short stories, and historical re-enactment. She works as a teaching artist in a variety of settings including, schools, museums, historical societies, churches, and festivals. She has produced two chapbooks and two CDs of poetry and short stories .  Vicie has participated in the Culture, Community and the Classroom program of Local Learning, in collaboration with the Arts Council of the Southern Tier as a teaching artist.

 

 

 

For Re-election to a Third Officer Term:

Kay Turner – NYC Region (folklorist, educator, author)  Vice President, Board of Directors

Born in Detroit. BA Rutgers University 1971 (Literature/Philosophy), MA/PhD University of Texas Austin 1989 (Folklore/Anthropology). Interim Director, Folk Arts Collections, San Antonio Museum of Art 1982-1984; Co-Founder/Associate Director, Texas Folklife Resources 1984-1991; Folk Arts Director, Brooklyn Arts Council 2000-2014. AFS: member since 1972, Executive Board 2006-2008; Elli Köngäs-Maranda Prize 2000, AFS Fellows 2013, Benjamin Botkin Prize 2013; Women’s, Public Programs, LGBTQA, and Folk Narrative Sections; New York Folklore Society: Board 2011-present; folk arts panels, consultancies, lectures, publications 1979-present. Adjunct Visiting Professor, Performance Studies Department, NYU 2000-present: courses include: women’s folklore, oral narrative theory, urban folklore, pedagogies of the ephemeral, ghost ontologies. Books include: Beautiful Necessity: The Art and Meaning of Women’s Altars, Transgressive Tales: Queering the Grimms (with Pauline Greenhill). Support includes: Woodrow Wilson, NEA, NYSCA, SSHRC, American Express, and MetLife. Public programs/exhibitions: Art Among Us/Arte Entre Nosotros (with Pat Jasper), Brooklyn Maqam: Arab Music Festival; Days of the Dead in Brooklyn: Diverse Traditions of Mourning and Remembrance; Folk Roots of the Black Brooklyn Renaissance, 1960-2010; Harborlore/Sandylore; September 11th Rethinking Memorial Series (2005-2011).

Folk Artists Benefit from Individual Artists’ Grants from the New York State Council on the Arts

Folk Artists Benefit from Individual Artists’ Grants from the New York State Council on the Arts

Folk and Traditional Artists pursue an art form or activity that is rooted within their community, family, and/or heritage. This form of artistic expression is often learned over time through repeated experience and purposeful or informal teaching. These one-on-one or apprentice-style relationships are how traditional arts thrive over generations. Apprenticeship Grants through the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) are one of the foundational tools in the field of folklore and folk arts in New York State.  Through this program, “master” artists take on one or more apprentices to pass on their skills and knowledge. Apprentices can be other community members or a member of their own family.

Another avenue of support via the New York State Council on the Arts are grants for artists to pursue their own projects and initiatives.  This category was new in 2022 for the Folk and Traditional Arts Category of NYSCA.  Folk and Traditional artist grants are allowing artists to execute programs, pieces, performances, workshops, etc. on their own.

Following New York State’s $105 million investment in the arts for FY2022, NYSCA has awarded more than $80 million in arts grants to organizations and individual artists since June 2021. Of that over $250,000 has been awarded directly to folk and traditional artists via Individual Artist and Apprenticeship Grants. Over 30 Folk and Traditional Artists in New York State received an apprenticeship or Individual Artist grant for 2022.

Recipients and art forms are various and include:

Apprenticeships 

Luis Cordero, Rosa and Felix Reyes and Edy Cordero, Bachata and Merengue via Long Island Traditions 

Juan José Gutiérrez  and Juan Gerena, Bomba y Plena  via LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21 

Clarence “Bucky” Geter and John Walton, Gospel Music via The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes

Richard Koski with Michael Ludgate and Katrina Mackey, Finnish American Dance Music via the The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes

Hayden Haynes and Darelyn Spruce, Seneca Bone Carving via The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes

Victor Manuel Garcia Gonzalez  AKA Dindy and Gomany Norales, drum making via HEDco; Bronx Music Heritage Center

Tashi Sharzur (Techung) with Mia and Jasmin Eames, Tibetan music and dance via New York Folklore  

Muhammad Ismail Durdi with Muhammad Yousaf and Muhammad Ayoob, Turkmen rug weaving via New York Folklore

Peniel Guerrier with Kayenne Charles-Pierre, Haitian traditional dance via the Center for Traditional Music and Dance   

Salieu Suso with Fode Diop, kora West African harp via the Center for Traditional Music and Dance   

Individual Artist Grants include the following:

Beareather Reddy for In My Soul 

Bonnie Gale for Exploring Willow Casket Making

Altin Stoja for Shining a Light, A Public Art Project in Greek Orthodox iconography. 

Nada Odeh for Arabic Calligraphy Workshop and Mural

Melvis Santa for Women Akpwon: Afro-Cuban Percussion and Song Workshops and Performances

Gretchen Koehler for Fiddling with Tradition

Esraa Warda for Rani Mrida Music and Dance Initiative

This is just a sampling of the many traditional arts activities and artists supported in 2022 through the New York State Council on the Arts.

36th Annual Folk Arts Roundtable

36th Annual Folk Arts Roundtable

Our 36th annual Roundtable has officially wrapped! This year we were joined by 35 of our colleagues at the Hotel Syracuse, the Roundtable’s Birthplace. It is poetic that while revisiting the Roundtable’s roots we welcomed a record number of new peers. We are thrilled to have folks representing organizations like Imamou Lele, Big Eyed Enterprises, and JouvayFest in our New York Folklore family.  

Monday morning began with a workshop hosted with Local Learning and led by teaching artists Juan Gutierrez-Rodriguez and Julia Gutierrez-Rivera of Los Pleneros de la 21. Juan and Julia started with an energetic demonstration of the Bomba y Plena and ended with discussions of best practices for artists. Folklorists brainstormed ways to support a network of Folk Arts in Education in New York.  

In the afternoon we dove into our Roundtable tradition, What We’re Doing Presentations. Presentations took place over Monday and Tuesday. Monday’s sessions were followed by a conversation about the state of the field in New York, led by New York Folklore board members; Kay Turner and Maria Kennedy. The Roundtable’s first day came to a close at a delicious group dinner at Eritrea Ethiopian Restaurant 

We were honored to be guests of the Skä•noñh Great Law of Peace Center, in Liverpool on Tuesday. At the Center, Frieda Jacques a clan mother from the Onondaga nation kept our group at rapt attention with her tour. Frieda’s tour was followed by Tim Frandy’s presentation on working with Indigenous communities. After a second round of What We’re Doing Presentation, roundtablers headed to an impromptu group dinner at Salt City Market – complete with a presentation by market staff about the good work by Allyn Family Foundation and Salt City Market. Thank you to roundtabler, artist, and Syracuse resident Nada Odeh for organizing the dinner.  

As we prepared to part ways on Wednesday, the Roundtable concluded with a discussion of advocacy, and strategy concerning forward movement as a field, as well as statewide initiatives by groups like Local Learning, Long Island Traditions, and of course New York Folklore’s Technical Assistance program and Voices. Remember Rountablers: Spread the word about the services that New York Folklore can provide to traditional and folk practitioners!   

For more information about Technical Assistance or Voices, please contact New York Folklore. For more information about self-guided audio tours by Travel Storys contact Nancy Soloman at Long Island Traditions.  

Thank you to everyone who joined us in person and virtually! We are looking forward to the next Roundtable in the spring of 2022 back in Syracuse!  

Welcome to Mira Johnson as the New York Folklore in Education Network Coordinator

Welcome to Mira Johnson as the New York Folklore in Education Network Coordinator

Felix Nelson, conducting a dance lesson as part of a Ghanaian drumming and dance residency

as part of the Schoharie River Center’s  Middleburgh, NY Advantage Afterschool Program in 2021.  Photo by Ellen McHale

 

Local Learning and New York Folklore are pleased to welcome Mira Johnson to the role of New York State Folklore in Education Network Coordinator. With a doctorate in Adult Education and Lifelong Learning from Penn State University and an M.A. in folklore from the University of Oregon, Mira is excited to bring her expertise from both the fields to the New York Folklore in Education Network.

Due to the growing interest and need to support authentic pathways between diverse tradition bearers and both formal and informal learning spaces, in 2021 Local Learning and New York Folklore partnered to hire a shared staff position at .5 fte who could engage and coordinate our growing folklore education network. We continue to invest in this position to connect and coordinate between sites where Culture, Community, and the Classroom programs have happened, as well as other arts, humanities, and culture activities of New York Folklore. In a recent survey of program participants in Local Learning and educational folklore programs, 84% of the respondents ranked their interest in participating in the New York Folklore in Education Network at the highest level, including participating in hybrid, face to face, and zoom gatherings. Mira will help conceptualize network activities to engage artists and educators from across the state.

As a regional culture specialist for Pennsylvania’s state folklife program, Mira conducted fieldwork with rural and urban folk artists and tradition bearers, and served as the program coordinator at FolkArtPA, Pennsylvania’s statewide folklife program. She later served as the Folk Arts and Education Coordinator at the Pelham Arts Center in Pelham, New York, where she oversaw the folk art performance and workshop series and worked to integrate folk art education into the center’s studio art curriculum.

Mira is also an adjunct assistant professor at Bronx Community College in the English Department and the First Year Seminar Program. She is currently board member and board secretary for New York Folklore. Her research addresses the role of traditional knowledge and ecological relationships in community-based education, as well as regional belief practices.

Mira started in this role September 1, 2021. She will be available at [email protected]