EVENTS

2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society

Ebru Workshop: Learn How to Marble Paper with Hatice Erbas-Sorkunlu

When: Saturday, March 30th, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: NYF Shop & Gallery, 129 Jay Street, Schenectady

Pre-registration and tuition required. Tuition: $5.00 for NYF members and children ages 5 to 12. $10.00 for non-members. Tuition includes workshop materials.

Join us for an hour to experience the art of Turkish paper marbling with artist Hatice Erbas-Sorkunlu! Participants will learn the ancient art of “Ebru”, the art of creating colorful patterns by sprinkling and brushing color pigments on a pan of oily water and then transferring this pattern to paper.

Marbling techniques are believed to have been invented in thirteenth century Turkistan. This decorative art then spread to China, India and Persia and Anatolia. Ottoman calligraphers and artists used marbling to decorate books, imperial decrees, official correspondence and documents.

Participants will be able to create their own Ebru pieces alongside Hatice Erbas-Sorkunlu in this one hour workshop.

2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society

Origami Workshop: Origami as a Therapy for Mind and Body with Yoshimi Arai

When: Saturday, April 6th, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. (Workshop #1), 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (Workshop #2)

Where: NYF Shop & Gallery, 129 Jay Street, Schenectady

Pre-registration and tuition required. Tuition: $10.00 for NYF members and children ages 5 to 12. $15.00 for non-members. Tuition includes workshop materials.

Join us in the morning or the afternoon for a couple hours with Yoshimi Arai to experience the ancient Japanese paper folding art of “Origami.” Not solely a “craft,” origami is a contemplative art that stimulates the brain, increases focus, and provides an avenue for meditation and self-awareness.

Yoshimi Arai is a Yuzen Washi (traditional Japanese paper) artist who fuses the traditional Japanese art of origami (folding paper) with western lacquer techniques producing beautiful, durable and wearable works of art that look like glass but weigh no more than a piece of paper. Originally from Japan, Yoshimi Arai is a resident of Westchester County.

 

EXHIBITIONS

2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society

Ebru: The Art of Turkish Paper Marbling with Hatice Erbas-Sorkunlu

When: Grand Opening is Saturday, March 30th, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Exhibit will remain on display through August 31, 2019.

Where: NYF Shop & Gallery, 129 Jay Street, Schenectady

New York Folklore’s inaugural Folk Art Gallery exhibition will showcase the work of Hatice Erbas-Sorkunlu. Ebru (Turkish paper marbling) is a traditional art where paint is floated in a tray of water and different tools and techniques are used to make unique designs on the surface, before being transferred to paper. Ebru is believed to have been invented in thirteenth century Turkistan. This decorative art then spread to China, India and Persia and Anatolia. Seljuk and Ottoman calligraphers and artists used marbling to decorate books, imperial decrees, official correspondence and documents. New forms and techniques were perfected in the process and Turkey remained the center of marbling for many centuries.

The Exhibition and programming are supported with public funds from the Schenectady County Initiative Program and the Folk Arts Program of the New York State Council on the Arts, with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Support for the New York Folk Art Gallery provided by the William Gundry Broughton Charitable Foundation.

 

2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society

In Harm’s Way: Community Responses to Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee

When: Open through May 2019

Where: Mabee Farm Historic Site of the Schenectady County Historical Society, Rotterdam Junction

In 2011, Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee delivered two consecutive blows to communities in the Schoharie and Mohawk Watershed, as torrential rains caused unprecedented flooding throughout the region. Five years later, in 2016, NYF Executive Director, Ellen McHale, began to record the personal experience narratives of flood survivors and volunteers: first through a series of community “sharing” sessions focused upon the volunteer experience and later through recording the personal experience stories of those whose lives and property had been directly impacted by the catastrophic flooding caused by Irene and Lee in the Mohawk and Schoharie Watersheds. This exhibition is one result of this documentation. It represents a partnership with Long Island Traditions with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.