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AROUND THE STATE

Calendar of Events, Announcements,
& Exhibitions
for New York State


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Around the State Calendar

Thank you for your interest in the New York Folklore Society and our calendar. We would like to inform you that as we search for ways to best serve our members, we have decided to phase out our statewide calendar listings. If you are interested in ways that you can stay involved with the New York Folklore Society, please contact us at info@nyfolklore.org.

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EVENTS by date & deadlines        • ANNOUNCEMENTS         • ONGOING EXHIBITIONS

Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Flushing Town Hall presents
Monthly Jazz Jam
7:00-
Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Boulevard, (at the corner of Linden Place), Flushing, NY 11354
Tickets: $10; FREE for Members, Students and Jamming Musicians

Held on the first Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jams are a fun way to hone your skills and jam with your peers. House band led by saxophonist Carol Sudhalter (Carol Sudhalter, tenor sax/flute; Joe Vincent Tranchina, piano; Eric Lemon, bass; Sylvia Cuenca, drums). All are welcome, regardless of instrument (vocalists, too!). Don’t play? Come listen!

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Thursday, May 4, 2017
The Troy Savings Bank Music Hall presents
The Wailin’ Jennys
7:30 p.m.
Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, 30 2nd St, Troy, NY 12180
Tickets: $39, $32, $29
Tickets are available now via phone, (518) 273-0038, in person, or online at www.troymusichall.org. Tickets are available at the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall Box Office, 30 Second Street, Troy, Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
The Wailin’ Jennys return to the Hall! The Jennys are Nicky Mehta, Ruth Moody and Heather Masse—three distinct voices that together make an achingly perfect vocal sound. Starting as a happy accident of solo singer-songwriters getting together for a one-time-only performance at a tiny guitar shop in Winnipeg, Manitoba, The Wailin’ Jennys have grown over the years into one of today’s most beloved international folk acts. Founding members Ruth Moody and Nicky Mehta along with New York-based Heather Masse continue to create some of the most exciting and exquisite music on the folk-roots scene, stepping up their musical game with each critically-lauded recording and thrilling audiences with their renowned live performances. Together they forge a unified folk-pop sound—all delivered with the irresistible vocal power of three.

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Friday, May 5, 2017
The Folkus Project presents
Loren Barrigar and Mark Mazengarb
8 p.m.
May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 East Genesee St, Syracuse, NY
Tickets range from $15 to $20. More info is available at www.folkus.org. Advance sale tickets are available via PayPal and other methods; advance ticket holders receive preferential seating.
The area’s favorite international guitar duo perform stunning duets, featuring their world class guitar talents. They share a unique musical chemistry and stage presence seldom found among musicians.

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Saturday, May 6, 2017
World Music Institute (WMI) presents
Festival in the Desert — Caravan of Peace: Ali Farka Touré Band & Terakaft
3 p.m.
2 p.m. Pre-performance Q&A with members of the Ali Farka Touré Band
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, Manhattan
Tickets: $40
The Festival in the Desert (éFestival au Désert”) was one of Africa’s most celebrated annual music festivals. Held in Mali, it showcased traditional Tuareg music and music from around the world. Shortly after the January 2012 festival, the Northern Mali conflict broke out and all Western and non-devotional music was outlawed. Exiled from the Sahara, Festival in the Desert brings its “caravan” to The Met for a rare concert. Ali Farka Tour” Band features the original band of the late guitarist led by his protegé Afel Bocoum and Mamadou Kelly. The band that toured the world together many times, whose late leader was the master of fusing traditional Malian music with New World blues, reunite with a mission to spread a message of peace and revisit the rich repertoire of the three-time Grammy Award winner.
Terakaft is one of the original Tuareg bands to emerge from the Sahara. The band leader Diara, was a founding member of Tinariwen. He left to join Terakaft who travel the world singing about its people, the Tuareg, a sub- Saharan African nomadic minority.
This concert is presented as part of WMI’s Desert Blues Series.

Eighth Step at Proctors presents
ALL ABOUT THE DRUM — Reggie Harris, Cheryl Prashker, and Brian Mellick

Proctors, 432 State Street, Schenectady, NY
Call Eighth Step TicketLine: 518-434-1703

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Thursday, May 11, 2017
World Music Institute (WMI) presents
Omar Souleyman
8 p.m.
(Le) Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, Manhattan
Tickets: $30 advance/$35 day of show tickets. Standing room with limited unreserved seating
Hailing from Syria, Omar Souleyman’s music is rooted in Dabke, a modern Levantine Arab folk circle dance of possible Canaanite or Phoenician origin. Hailed as an “unexpected preacher of love,” Souleyman has become a worldwide sensation in modern world and electronic music circles, though he began his career as a wedding singer in Syria. Who could’ve foreseen that a wedding singer from Ras al-Ayn, Syria with over 500 albums under his belt would become a cult hero amongst world and electronic music connoisseurs? But there is an undeniable bond between the legacy the 50-year-old delves in—a synthesized version of Dabke—and so-called acid house. Artists like Björk, Four Tet (who produced his breakthrough album Wenu Wenu), Modeselektor and Gilles Peterson are honored to have worked with a master like Souleyman. With so much strife in the modern world, there’s comfort to be found in how this Syrian sings about the great theme of love as the war drum beat rages on carelessly. This is, after all, music’s virtue: the ability to dissolve us in time and space, building bridges where walls previously were to be found.
This concert is presented as part of WMI’s Counterpoint Series.

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Friday, May 12, 2017
The Troy Savings Bank Music Hall presents
The Kingston Trio
7:30 p.m.
Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, 30 2nd St, Troy, NY 12180
Tickets: $37, $29
Tickets are available now via phone, (518) 273-0038, in person, or online at www.troymusichall.org. Tickets are available at the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall Box Office, 30 Second Street, Troy, Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Formed in 1957, The Kingston Trio emerged from San Francisco’s North Beach club scene to take the country by storm, bringing the rich tradition of American folk music into the mainstream for the first time. During the late 50s & early 60s, the Trio enjoyed unprecedented record sales and worldwide fame, while influencing the musical tastes of a generation. The Trio is one of the few groups today that has survived the many changes in the world of music, remaining consistent in their sound, which may explain their resurgence in popularity over the last few years. Today, the Kingston Trio consists of George Grove, Bill Zorn and Rick Dougherty. Through changing times, the Trio has played on, remaining popular and known for great songs that sound as good today as the first time you heard them. Over forty years after the song, “Tom Dooley” shot to the top of the charts, the Trio is still on the road 30 weeks out of the year, bringing back all the great memories and making new ones.

Eighth Step at Proctors presents
TOM PAXTON with The Don Juans

Proctors, 432 State Street, Schenectady, NY
Call Eighth Step TicketLine: 518-434-1703

World Music Institute (WMI) presents
Shujaat Khan
7:30 p.m.
Q & A with the artist (held in between sets) moderated by Akeel Bilgrami, Sidney Morgenbesser Professor of Philosophy, Columbia University
Miller Theatre, 2960 Broadway at 116th Street, Manhattan
Tickets: $15/$25/$35
Co-presented with South Asia Institute at Columbia University
Shujaat Khan is a sitar virtuoso whose musical pedigree extends seven generations. He is the son and disciple of the great sitarist Ustad Vilayat Khan, nephew of Imrat Khan, and a member of one of the oldest and most prestigious musical families and schools of India — the Imdadkhani Gharana of Etawah. Khan was the featured artist at musical concerts celebrating India’s 50th anniversary of independence at Carnegie Hall, Paramount Theatre in Seattle, and Meyers Symphony Theater in Dallas. The Rain, an album featuring Shujaat Khan and the Indo-Persian Ghazal ensemble, was nominated for a Grammy Award for “Best Traditional World Music Album.” For this concert, he will be joined by Samir Chatterjee on tabla. Samir Chatterjee is a virtuoso tabla player from the Farrukhabad Gharana school. He has travelled widely across the world to perform as a soloist and as an accompanist with many outstanding musicians from both Indian and Western musical traditions.
This concert is presented as part of WMI’s Masters of Indian Music Series.

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Saturday, May 13, 2017
Golden Link Folk Singing Society presents: Bill Staines
7:30 p.m.
Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave., Penfield, NY 14526
Advance $20 ($15 for Golden Link members); at the door $22 ($17 for Golden Link members); $10 for students; free to children 12 and under.
Quintessential folk musician Bill Staines brings a slice of Americana to Rochester with his songs of cowboys, Yukon adventurers, fisherman, truckers, and everyday working people.

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Tuesday, May 16, 2017
The Arts Center of the Capital Region presents
Social Media May: Pottery & Mudslides II
5:30-7:30 p.m.
The Arts of the Capital Region, 265 River Street, Troy, NY 12180
Cost: $35; Sign up online
Channel your inner Patrick Swayze (again) and learn how to throw on a potter’s wheel. The only mudslide you’ll be experiencing is the one in your glass.

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Thursday, May 18, 2017
Eighth Step at Proctors presents
Open Mic Theme: Moms, Dads & Kids
Sign-up starts at 6:45 p.m.
Fenimore Gallery, Proctors, 432 State Street, Schenectady, NY
Performers do individual sets onstage until about 8:30 p.m. We then join each other for a song circle and jam, backing each other up, joining in on harmonies or trying out new tunes. The jam is popular! If you are too shy to perform up in front, or if you want to try out something in a more casual way, the jam part of the night is perfect. And it’s a fine time to just sing or play along. It’s an early night for Open Mic, closing up by 9:30 p.m.
Each month has a “theme” or topic for the month. Suggested—NOT REQUIRED. It is a nudge to bring something you wouldn’t otherwise bring, either for the time on stage or for the round robin afterward. We post the themes ahead of time to give us all a chance to write, think of or collect something interesting to bring. Feel free to stretch the idea of the topic in any direction, or ignore it. Poetry and Storytelling are also welcome! At each Open Mic, participants are eligible for a free drawing for upcoming Eighth Step shows!

World Music Institute (WMI) presents
Rajeev Taranath
7:30 p.m.
Lincoln Center Atrium, 61 W 62nd St, Manhattan
Free: Limited unreserved seating
Rajeev Taranath is one of the world’s leading exponents of the sarod. A distinguished disciple of Ali Akbar Khan, his performances masterfully combine the depth and rigor of the tradition of Hindustani classical music with an inspired imagination and emotional intensity. Hailed as a prodigy in Hindustani music, he was trained by his father Pandit Taranath and other eminent musicians and was a concert and radio artist before he was twenty. Rajeev has toured extensively throughout the world. He has also composed music for several nationally and internationally honored Indian films and is the recipient of the Indian Government’s highest award in the arts, the Sangeet Natak Academi Award. For this concert, he will be joined by Udayraj Karpur on tabla.
This concert is presented as part of WMI’s Masters of Indian Music Series.

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Friday, May 19, 2017
The Folkus Project presents
Ellis Paul
8 p.m.
May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 East Genesee St, Syracuse, NY
Tickets range from $15 to $20. More info is available at www.folkus.org. Advance sale tickets are available via PayPal and other methods; advance ticket holders receive preferential seating.
Wise, tender, brilliant and biting, Ellis Paul is one of the leading voices in American songwriting. His joyful enthusiasm and sweet voice make him one of the folk circuit’s most popular performers. Paul has built a vast catalog of music which weds striking poetic imagery and philosophical introspection with hook-laden melodies.

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Sunday, May 21, 2017
NorthWest Family YMCA presents
Acoustic Music Jam
2-4 p.m.
NorthWest Family YMCA, 8040 River Road, Baldwinsville NY 13027
For more information, contact the Arts Director at 315-303-5966 ext. 225.
Cost: Free to members and non-members (no registration needed).
Folk, Traditional, Country, Bluegrass, Rock and Pop music is welcome. The Jam is open to all ages and skill levels, members and non-members alike. No registration is required. Bring your musical instruments (guitar, voice, banjo, mandolin, flute, etc.) and a music stand. Come join in the fun or just to listen. The Jam is hosted by Steve and Karen Pfanenstiel.

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       ANNOUNCEMENTS

Cricket Media seeks folktales, fiction, non-fiction, and poetry submissions for its literary magazines for children and teens

Cricket Media seeks folktales, fiction, non-fiction, and poetry submissions for its literary magazines for children and teens: Babybug (ages 0–3), Ladybug (ages 3–6), Spide (ages 6–9), Cricket (ages 9–14), and Cicada (ages 14 and up). Especially welcome: works by LGBTQIA+ writers/artists, writers/artists with disabilities, and writers/artists of color. We are sensitive to issues of cultural appropriation and misrepresentation.

Visit us at cricketmag.submittable.com/submit for more details.

Call for Submissions: Journeys
Deadline: March 24, 2017

Ladybug and Babybug, magazines for children age 6 and under, seek fiction, nonfiction, and poetry about journeys. For a young child, a journey might be a walk to the corner store, a long trip by boat or train, or a game of make believe. Stories should have childlike points of view and simple yet strong plots; they need to be short, too (under 800 words). When reading submissions, we look for playfulness, humor, and a sense of wonder. Most of our readers live in the United States, and sensitive explorations of different cultures are welcome.

Call for Submissions: Contemporary Fiction
Deadline: March 27, 2017

Cricket (for ages 9–14) seeks contemporary middle-grade fiction of 1,200 to 1,800 words. Strong submissions will feature a protagonist who is actively engaged in the challenge and adventure of being a kid—taking on new responsibilities, discovering hidden talents, overcoming fears, or meeting new and surprising people. The tone may be lighthearted or serious—exploring with friends or facing problems at home or school. Stories should have an authentic voice, revealing character primarily through action and dialogue, and reach a satisfying resolution. Stories set within city environments, or in non-American settings, and featuring characters from underrepresented groups are especially welcome.

Call for Submissions: Folktales, Myths, and Legends
Deadline: April 27, 2017

Cricket (for ages 9–14) and Spider (ages 6–9) are looking for retellings of folktales, myths, and legends from around the world. We seek tales of humorous tricksters, of adventurous heroes on epic quests, of clever and strong women, lovable fools, and formidable demons, as well as traditional wisdom tales and creation myths. Retellings should be lively and dramatic, with an authentic voice that engages the imaginations of our young readers. They must also be well researched, accurately reflecting the meanings and traditions of the story’s cultural background. Please include a list of sources and your credentials with your submission.

Call for Submissions: Hauntings
Deadline: March 27, 2017

Cicada YA/teen lit magazine seeks fiction, poetry, comics, and essays on the theme of Hauntings. A haunting is a remnant of something that never really left and refuses to be completely forgotten. A house might be haunted by the spirit of a previous owner, or a person might be constantly shadowed by past events. Maybe someone is always on your mind, or maybe you are constantly dwelling on what could have been. Show us what's rattling chains in your dark corners.

Call for Submissions: Aliens
Deadline: April 27, 2017

Cicada YA/teen lit magazine seeks fiction, poetry, comics, and essays on the theme of Aliens. Tell us a story of a stranger in a strange land, whether they be a three-headed visitor from the Andromeda Galaxy or just someone trying to navigate an unfamiliar place. Of course, feeling like an alien does not always have to do with physical location—sometimes you might feel like an alien in familiar spaces. We love works about extraterrestrials and outer space, but we also encourage authentic and diverse works about immigration, gentrification, and feelings of otherness and dissociation. Not welcome: cultural appropriation.

Call for Submissions: Puppets and Dolls
Deadline: May 27, 2017

Cicada YA/teen lit magazine seeks fiction, poetry, comics, and essays on the theme of Puppets and Dolls. Around the world, puppets and dolls serve many purposes—children’s toys, storytelling props, decoration, conduits for the supernatural. How do we pull one another’s strings to get what we want? How do we project our feelings onto one another? How can this harm a relationship? Respectful works exploring manipulation/toxic relationships: great. Exploitative, explicit, or abusive works: nope. Also encouraged: works about totally non-metaphorical dolls and magnificent puppetry performances.

Call for Submissions: Flash Fiction
Deadline: rolling deadline Wanted: your flash fic.




ONGOING EXHIBITIONS AND PRODUCTIONS
Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art presents the
TEXT/URES OF IRAQ: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM THE COLLECTION OF ODED HALAHMY
Curated by Murtaza Vali
Hours: Wednesday-Sunday: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Howard Greenberg Family Gallery, Samuel Dorsksy Museum of Art, State University of New York, 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY 12561, 845.257.3844
Suggested Donation: $5
The exhibition also includes examples of modern Arabic and Hebrew calligraphy, illustrating texts from both Western and Islamic philosophical traditions, as well as works that evoke hurufiyah, an influential modern Arab variant of Lettrism, which used the swoops and curves of the Arabic alphabet as painterly gestures. From abstract collages constructed out of the remains of destroyed books to the Hebrew calligraphy seen in Halahmy’s art, these works demonstrate the importance of the literary in Iraqi society, culture and visual arts, both past and present.

This exhibition, drawn from the personal collection of New York-based sculptor Oded Halahmy, a Jewish native of Baghdad, presents his work alongside that of eight contemporary artists from Iraq. Literary culture—letters, words and books—has been a mainstay of Iraqi culture for many millennia. The ancient civilizations that inhabited the territory constituting modern day Iraq were responsible for the development of cuneiform, one of the earliest systems of writing, and ancient texts like the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Code of Hammurabi. In the centuries following the advent of Islam, Baghdad was the most important center of knowledge and learning, home to the dar al hikma or House of Wisdom, the largest and most famous library in the world at the time of its destruction in the thirteenth century by invading Mongol armies.

Text and texture have a shared origin: texere, or Latin for “to weave.” The exhibition uses this shared word root to enmesh the idea of text with that of texture. While the layered and abraded surfaces of some of the works in this exhibition reference the region’s ancient past and/or its violent present, the picturesqueness of others captures the powerful affective textures of nostalgia and exile. Celebrating their country as a pastoral idyll, where people of different beliefs, cultures, and ethnicities peacefully coexisted for centuries, these works also mourn the eventual fraying of the once rich fabric of Iraqi culture.

Participating Artists: Hayder Ali, Amal Alwan, Mohmammed al Hamadany, Oded Halahmy, Ismail Khayat, Hanaa Malallah, Hassan Massoudy, Naziha Rashid, and Qasim Sabti


February 4, 2017 —May 21, 2017

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NEW YORK FOLKLORE SOCIETY ♦ 129 Jay Street ♦ Schenectady, NY 12305 ♦ 518.346.7008 ♦ Fax 518.346.6617 ♦ nyfs@nyfolklore.org